Better late than never planting???

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by DagoDucks, Jul 11, 2018.

  1. DagoDucks

    DagoDucks Senior Refuge Member

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    ILL & MO
    Mother Nature decided to unleash around 8" of rain from June 9-12 around and north of us sending the Kaskaskia River out of its banks and over our levees wiping out our duck impoundment. It took 3 weeks to get the water back off then we got hit with another 1.85" of rain on Sunday July1st. Finally we were able to get back into the field yesterday to start replanting.
    We originally though we would have time to get 90 day corn in and I managed to find some in Indiana that we had shipped in. However that window closed to have enough time to dry down and not be frost killed. On to plan C which is 65 day CM 533RR Canamaize. Luckily I had 3 bags left over from last year.
    The diagram below shows how we are laying out the corn soybeans and Jap Millet. The 3 red spots are the locations of our blinds. There is a good variance in slope (about 2') from the southwest corner of the field to the northeast. We will be able to pump water in for teal season on the southwest corner without affecting the crops in the rest of the field.
    I set the plant rate at 25,100 seeds/acre for the Canamaize as I was trying to get as much coverage as possible out of it. Ended up having enough left in the hoppers to go back through the planted area and plant at a 90 degree angle, basically a cross hatch pattern. I don't think the finger pick ups on my JD 7000 were able to grasp the small seed so there are probably quite a few skips.
    We have used Canamaize on some small test plots in the past but never 8acres of it so we are not sure how well this will work. Put on 130lbs/acre of Anhydrous immediately after planting.The 90 day corn was planted just to give some cover from a road south of us and to be able to hide the one blind.
    We are leaving about 4.5acre of soybeans standing as we learned a couple of years ago when we were not able to harvest all of our beans that the ducks really liked the leftovers. We are using the shortest maturity soybean which I believe is 3-1 and they are going in the ground today. Planning on spreading the Jap Millet on Friday just in time for predicted rains over the weekend.
    One thing we have learned over the years is that Mother Nature is always in charge, all we can do is react to the conditions she sets forth. Each year we try something a little different and learn from it.
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  2. Drakes Landing

    Drakes Landing Senior Refuge Member

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    In years past when we had a flood out situation and it was too late to plant we just disced and let the wild millet come. It was incredible the amount of it that was in the seed bank. Probably not telling you something you don’t know but sometimes mother nature can produce an incredible food source. The beauty of that is you can mow, shred and manipulate to your hearts content.

    Good luck.

    PS......please send us some of that rain.
     
    WHUP ! Hen likes this.
  3. DagoDucks

    DagoDucks Senior Refuge Member

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    ILL & MO
    It is always a gamble seeing what will sprout up after we disc. Last year we had a big problem with cocklebur in our low area. The year before there was a great stand of barnyard grass. Right now it looks like the undesirables are winning so I would rather just disc and spread the millet. I might have risked letting the barnyard grass come up on its own had our corn crop not been flooded out but I need to make sure we have at least one good stand of duck food.
    As for the rain, last year we didn’t see a sizeable rain from this point until late December so I am hoping that we don’t repeat that. Ended up not being able flood our field.
    83F59DFB-6A03-4999-AAD4-BF4021D41948.jpeg 2379C791-F049-40B3-80C0-95ACA6DB176E.jpeg C4801ADF-8416-4C2A-AA4E-93DDE682F63A.jpeg No water = no ducks.
     
  4. Drakes Landing

    Drakes Landing Senior Refuge Member

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    Makes sense and we duck hunters have a tough time not planting something. Believe me I get it. if weed competition is too high certainly understand that. You want productive natural foods for sure. I'm not 100% sure but I think you can spray wild millet with 2-4-D. I have not done that but I would assume one could to prevent broadleafs. The problem with that is you would not want to spray it on Smartweed as I believe that would be categorized as a broadleaf..............anyone know for sure?
     
  5. WHUP ! Hen

    WHUP ! Hen Elite Refuge Member

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    DagoDucks, I am on about the same plain as you are. A 3.1 bean is pretty early. I have had the best luck with late planted bean by planting anywhere from 4.5 to 4.8. I had an old extension agent tell me that if you wanted an early bean plant it first, the later it gets plant a later maturing bean. It’s worked for me for many years. And ducks love beans.
     
  6. DagoDucks

    DagoDucks Senior Refuge Member

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    Location:
    ILL & MO
    My farmer made the decision on the beans and ended up planting a 3.4 variety. I will be curious to see how that works out. Everything else we planted ourselves.
    To Drakes Landing's point about having to plant something, I may have over done the Jap Millet yesterday. Our farmer had worked the field over and the soil was absolutely perfect. Ended up broadcast spreading 8 bags over 10 acres, got out the harrow and drug the field then went back over it with the cultipacker. Overkill for sure but the field sure looks nice.
    Yes, smartweed is a broadleaf. Our original plan for that lower 11.5 acres was to establish a solid stand of it that would keep coming back but the cockleburs became a huge problem last year and we abandoned that idea.
     
  7. JFG

    JFG Elite Refuge Member

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    Dago, we’re those 25 or 50 lb. bags? If the later, it’s on a pretty thick in that broadcast rates are 20-25 lbs./ac. As I’m sure you’re aware of, too many plants means too much competition that affect overall growth/production.

    I’ve been fortunate that I’ve not had to deal with any cocklebur in my pond, first time I saw a few plants I quickly eradicated them. I’m wondering if you could control them, if not rid them in the area you mentioned by waiting next year until they germinate, spray, lightly disk, spray again when the others come up, then come back with a good coverage of jap millet. Jap is also used by farmers as a “smother” crop due to its fast and thick emergence, thus eliminating most competition. Seems like it might work but I don’t have any experience doing it. Just a thought ...
     
  8. WHUP ! Hen

    WHUP ! Hen Elite Refuge Member

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    Burrs will continue to germinate the entire season. Shade is the best herbicide you can have, jap may work but it would have to be dam thick. I don’t know how big your area is, some years will have trouble with burrs. My grandson and half dozen of his buddies patrol the area and glyphosate
    the burrs and canary grass. It’s taken us a while but we no longer have much of a burr problem, canary grass is still a bitch.
     

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