Blindside 3" 20ga #3

Discussion in 'Shooting - Reloading Forum' started by eagle rider, Jan 9, 2019.

  1. eagle rider

    eagle rider Refuge Member

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    Okay so next and somewhat related question. This is an old Ithaca XL900 recoil gun. These loads (I just looked) have a 1500 fps velocity..... I'm still thinking that should be okay in this gun. Any thought/experience?
     
  2. JP

    JP Elite Refuge Member

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    ^^^ Check the bolt buffer located in the aft section of the receiver to make sure it isn’t worn or broken. This little component is designed to sacrifice for the sake of the bolt/receiver from the forces of firing.
     
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  3. riceducker

    riceducker Senior Refuge Member

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    ^^^^^^^^^^^This^^^^^^^^^^^ Kent F/S #3's. Have sat next to my Brother in the blind for the past four seasons, who shoots a Benelli M-1 20 Ga. with these loads. They kill fine. Surprised the hell out of me.
     
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  4. Northhunter

    Northhunter Senior Refuge Member

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    I tried 3" 5's outta my BPS 20 this season as a sort of experiment. These are not the HV version however.. only 1300fps. But I figured they would be good for wing shooting woodies @ about 25-35 yards because of the way the shot cloud disperses and the pellet count. I had a good shoot on first wave ringers with them as well. I normally shoot Kent FS through a Carlson Imp Mod. I really like their 2 3/4" 7/8oz #5 load.. but it's a tight shooter and 1500fps. The Blindsides are 1 1/16oz and good for fast, close in work with the same choke. If I have to do clean-up @ the edge of the blocks or a couple groups of birds stay out a bit, I just switch back to the Fasteel. I don't have to dink around with the choke.

    They worked quite well and fill a niche. I picked up some more.
     
  5. Northhunter

    Northhunter Senior Refuge Member

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    7/8oz payload is fine. But what you might find is the hex shot will cause your pattern to open up a little too quick and limit your range, especially @ 1500fps. The wad holds things together nicely, but once it's out of the equation the load is basically a spreader. IMO, you'd be better off with 4's or 5's for teal/woodies. Kent makes an "upland fasteel" load in 5's that patterns and works well. The Browning stuff (loaded by Winchester) that throws a full ounce might be good too.
     
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  6. Squaller

    Squaller Elite Refuge Member

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    I have never purchased or patterned blindside... I have some experienced duck hunting friends who swear by them...

    But with my knowledge of physics, these loads do not make sense... Shooting a square pellet which should spread faster while also using a wad to hold the pattern together, makes no sense... Add to that, that a square pellet will lose velocity and energy more quickly, it seems counterintuitive to use square pellets over round ones...

    And, Northhunter, just as you posted, I would think the pattern would fall apart quickly once the wad separates from the pattern (just as with BlackCloud loads).

    I have fired these loads, and did notice that they recoil more (in a 12 ga.).

    And the claim that square pellets stack better so you get more pellets is a load of hockey... 1 oz of pellets is 1 oz of pellets... In order to increase the pellet count you have to increase the payload...
     
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  7. Northhunter

    Northhunter Senior Refuge Member

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    Thing is, they are able to increase the payload. The 3" 5's I tried are the heaviest payload of steel in 20ga on the market.
    Their 12ga stuff is the old "magnum" steel shot charges (1 1/4oz in 2 3/4", 1 3/8 in 3") but without the old slow as molasses velocities.
    The shot is actually more round than square.. at least the 5's I cut open were. Kinda hard to describe.
    Lots of marketing work for sure, but by design they are a mid range load and work very well.
     
  8. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator Flyway Manager

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    No. They aren't. As mentioned above, 1oz is 1oz. And they don't 'stack' them when they load them, they drop them just like any other shot.

    Now, if a square pellet takes up less physical 'space', fine. It might be shorter in diameter from side to side than a round pellet. But what happens when you measure corner to corner? In the end, you are either getting a couple more pellets than in round, but what does that matter? It is still 1oz. They don't fly like round pellets, they don't penetrate like round pellets, they lose velocity faster than round pellets.

    Where is the advantage?

    Look, if you are happy with a shell that has limited capabilities, keep shooting them. Where a round pellet works 'properly' at a defined set of ranges, a square pellet works at a more limited set of ranges. You can adjust the ranges the round pellet works simply by applying more or less choke. Since the BS (love that acronym) works via the wad, you have less opportunity to adjust how the shot pattern develops.

    In other words, if you want to shoot at 15-25 yards, you shoot a Cylinder choke. You want 25-35 yards, you shoot an I/C or LtMod. You want 35-45 yards, you shoot a Mod, or ImpMod. It is the choke that is doing the work. With BS, the choke really doesn't matter, or not nearly as much. The wad isn't even opening up until 15 yards, and then the pellets start scattering like leaves in the wind. You can pretty much forget the 35-45 yard patterns.

    I guess if you are hunting a creek, and there is a line of trees on the other side that is 28 yards away, you know nothing will be further, and those BS shells work.

    But I would hate to buy shells for one specific spot, and have the pretty much worthless if I hunted somewhere that the shots were a wee more challenging.

    So, if you are happy shooting them, keep doing it. I never tell anyone they aren't happy with their shells when they actually are. But don't try to convince us a gimmick like square shot is a better way to go. It isn't.
     
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  9. JP

    JP Elite Refuge Member

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    My field experience/observation of Winchester Blind Side was when a cousin came out ~4 seasons ago the next to last week of the season. Of the nine mallards he downed only one was disabled to the point it didn’t require follow up shots as the other eight. When dressing out the birds, we noticed that virtually all the pellets stopped at .25-.50” of penetration. Our conclusion was that with larger birds, while it would knock them down lethal penetration was nonexistent. He took the rest of the flat back to Alabama and sold them to the pilgrims. IMO, #4 or #5 regular steel is far and away superior.
     
  10. Joe Hunter

    Joe Hunter Senior Refuge Member

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    Here are some of my pellet measurements, counts and weights from the 1 3/8 oz load of Blind Side that may shed some light on this.

    "Here are some additional numbers to show how the Hex Steel pellets measured up against normal spherical steel pellets. The 1 3/8-ounce No. 2 Hex Steel load contained an average of 176 pellets weighing 595.8 grains, an average of 3.39 grains/pellet. A 1 3/8-ounce load of spherical No. 2 steel pellets should contain about 170 pellets weighing 601.6 grains, approximately 3.53 grains/pellet.

    To get some idea of the diameter of these cubic-shaped pellets, I randomly selected 10 Hex Steel pellets and measured the width between one pair of opposing flat sides and the width between one pair of opposing corners with a micrometer. The width between the flats measured an average of almost .130 inches, the diameter of a No. 4 shot, and the width from corner to corner averaged just shy of .160 inches, the diameter of a No. 1 pellet."

    Hope this helps, good luck!
     
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