call for ringnecks/blackjacks

Discussion in 'Diver Hunters Forum' started by Glades Ranger, Jun 9, 2018.

  1. Feathers

    Feathers Senior Refuge Member

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    They do not stay in MN over winter A small amount of hardy mallards, Golden eye and Canada’s brave the winters in n MN. Some necks bread here but most use it as a stop on their migration. They fatten up on the wild rice crops and fresh water shrimp. Rice lake national wild life refuge holds 100’s of thousands to over a million each fall and a majority are ringers although I think the refuge counts are a bit inflated. I’ve been fortunate to see a few massive migrations of 50k+ birds that staged up and left all at once. Two of those were neck migrations. The roar of wings could be heard from a couple miles away. The sounds of jets when they’re bombing in out of the heavens will never get old. When you get in to the right spot they can put on the show.
     
  2. Rick Hall

    Rick Hall Elite Refuge Member

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    Klondike, Louisiana
    I don't know the first thing about DJ's diver call, but the air presentation to make most any mallard call do a diver burr, is created at the back of your mouth. If you can gargle, you can burr, as the later is just a short burst of the former through a call.
     
  3. Glades Ranger

    Glades Ranger Elite Refuge Member

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    Florida
    Feathers, that description you gave is great! I have seen/heard a couple of thousand ringer concentrations down here and it is something else! Have had flocks of +50 birds strafe my blind and deafen my ears with that rush!
     
  4. Northhunter

    Northhunter Refuge Member

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    Jul 9, 2001
    Location:
    Northern Ontario, Canada
    We've always called them "Ringbills". Growing up a lot of local guys referred to them as "bluebills", either because they didn't care to differentiate or didn't actually know they were shooting ringers (they are typically not plumed out when we get them). They are our bread and butter here too.. I'm in Ontario some distance E of Sault. Michigan.

    Anybody ever get bands? I've always been curious as to where ours come from. They are a boreal forest duck, I know that... but we are in boreal forest and never actually see resident birds. They just show up rather early and in very good numbers most years (they are here now, and have been here in numbers for about 10 days).
    I got a band off one maybe 10yrs ago, but sadly it was banded locally.

    Our first wave is typically the first week of October and is the strongest in numbers. Seems to be more juvies with it than later flights, but the first wave never decoys well. Our better shooting is later on when they take notice of dekes and will actually work a spread.
     
  5. Glades Ranger

    Glades Ranger Elite Refuge Member

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    Florida
    Shot three banded ringers over the years; two banded in Ontario, one in Lakeport, Florida.
     
  6. mmayes

    mmayes Diver Forum Mod Moderator

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    Near AINTRY
    Sweet!!!

    Mayes
     

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