Delaware Swan Hunt?

Discussion in 'Chesapeake Flyway Forum' started by Bwana1, Jan 13, 2019.

  1. Tailfeathers

    Tailfeathers Elite Refuge Member

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    Swan are incredible. Body is About 1.5 the size of a Canada, a lotta wing and a lot of neck. You mouth call by mimmicking what you hear them do. I found some ultra huge Canada decoys for $10 each one summer, bought all 6 and painted them white. Work great with 6 old Canada silouettes painted white. Boy, when They hit the ground it is something you will remember. My first one landed in a 6 inch deep puddle and sent up a geiser that the boys on the other end of the farm could see from their blind. Breasts are bigger and taste like veal, kinda. Dont let a dog retrieve one that isnt definitly dead. Nasty arse talons and a bill that can pull nails out of an oak board.
     
  2. Blackduck

    Blackduck Senior Refuge Member

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    Delaware gets 84 permits this season from what I just read in VA's season framework.
     
  3. Allan

    Allan Elite Refuge Member

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    84 more than we had!
     
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  4. Montauker

    Montauker Elite Refuge Member

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    I see a banded swan in someone's future....
     
  5. Tailfeathers

    Tailfeathers Elite Refuge Member

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    Only 84? Doesn't Va get 600?
     
  6. Montauker

    Montauker Elite Refuge Member

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    Hey dope, SHHHHH!!!!


    Not sure how the calculation is done but DE has about 1/4 of the waterfowl hunters that VA has.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019
  7. joecitrano

    joecitrano Senior Refuge Member

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    Hell yeah! When’s the lottery lol!
     
  8. Allan

    Allan Elite Refuge Member

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    Actually, I think those 84 tags come out of NC and/or VA’s allotment.
     
  9. Blackduck

    Blackduck Senior Refuge Member

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    Correct, it did. I think VA's allotment increased though.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019
  10. Blackduck

    Blackduck Senior Refuge Member

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    From the VA Season Framework

    • TUNDRA SWANS. The Eastern Population of tundra swans nest in arctic tundra areas from Alaska, east to Hudson Bay and Baffin Island. These birds winter in coastal areas from Maryland to North Carolina.

    • There were 111,600 eastern population tundra swans counted on the 2017-18 Mid-Winter Survey, which was 6% lower than the 2016-17 count (119,300), but above the long term-average.

    • Similar to other arctic nesting species (AP Canada Geese and Atlantic Brant), productivity for Tundra swans in 2018 was well below average in 2018.

    • Prior to this year, eight states in the U.S. hunted tundra swans including Alaska, Utah, Montana and Nevada in the Pacific Flyway, North Dakota and South Dakota in the Central Flyway, and North Carolina and Virginia in the Atlantic Flyway.

    • In 2019-20, Delaware will initiate it’s first tundra swan hunting season.

    • Starting in 2019-20, the allocation of hunt permits in the Atlantic Flyway will be split between the 3 states that will have tundra swan hunting seasons (DE, VA, NC), in proportion to the number of swans in each state. North Carolina will be allocated 6,115 permits, Virginia will be allocated 801 permits, and Delaware will be allocated 84 permits.

    • The tundra swan hunting season in Virginia is authorized and conducted as specified in the Atlantic Flyway Tundra Swan Management Plan and Hunt Plan, with limits and guidelines as specified under an MOU with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

    If my memory serves, I think VA had 750 permits and NC had 6250 last year. Looks like the total number of permits has stayed the same, but the allocation has shifted north. Since all wintering birds are shifting their wintering grounds north I guess this makes sense.
     
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