Ford 309 Planter

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by hightech1953, Jun 10, 2019.

  1. hightech1953

    hightech1953 Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    792
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2007
    Location:
    Moncks Corner , SC
    Been looking in my area (South Carolina)for a two row planter and every thing is sky high. Getting a Ford 309 has been on my mind. Well they are going between $1000 and $1250 for a decent one.Well I got a call today about a older gentleman that has one to sell. I talked to the owner and he said it was in good shape with the only problem being it needs one of the chains replaced. He is asking $400. He is going to get pics to me of it . If it looks ok I will go inspect in person.What are you guys opinion on these planters. What should I look for when and if I go look at it? It also has about 30 seed plates with it.
     
  2. stevena198301

    stevena198301 Elite Refuge Member Supporting Member

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    Jan 6, 2015
    Location:
    HSV, Alabama
    There are still parts available for them. I thought about getting one, but for the price per row, you can just about get a JD 7000 4-row unit (my tractor is big enough to handle the bigger planter). Folks is proud of those 309s. Especially if they have rebuilt them.

    That price isn’t a bad deal at all, especially with all those plates. I’d say go for it!
     
  3. PaulinKansas

    PaulinKansas Elite Refuge Member

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    Nov 17, 2000
    Location:
    Coffeyville, KS
    I have a Dearborn 2 row planter. Ford bought the copyrights/patent for it in the 1940's I believe. They renamed it the 309.
    When you inspect it, make sure the seed hoppers have not rusted through. Look at all the sprockets. Make sure none of the teeth have broken off.
    My hopper had rusted through. JB Weld and sheet metal fixed it.
    One of the teeth on the drive sprocket had broken off. A brazing rod, oxy/acet torch, and a Dremel tool made a new one.
    $400 seems like a reasonable price for the planter with 15 pairs of plates. I paid $75 for mine with one pair.
     
  4. twall

    twall Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    328
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2006
    Location:
    Ohio
    Having plates is a huge bonus. If you think you can make it work it sounds like a pretty good deal. The amount and type of land you have makes a difference too.

    Tom
     
  5. hartfish

    hartfish Elite Refuge Member

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    Feb 10, 2005
    Location:
    virginia
    I've been using one for sunflowers for about five years but I don't have the right plates so I was dropping several seeds in one spot. The best solution I came up with was to mix the seed with fertilizer so hopefully the seeds will be spread out and they get the added benefit of the fertilizer. (Mine does not have a separate fertilizer hopper.)

    That said, the planter will not cover the seed. You will have to drag the field afterwards. You might be able to engineer something that pulls dirt back over the groove. I added a section of heavy chain right behind each dropper tube. It helps, but it doesn't bury all of them.

    Also, this is not a no-till planter. Unless you have real soft soil, you will have to disk it to get the planter to dig deep enough to get the seed below the soil surface. The runners/skids will also clog up with grass if the field is not grass/weed-free before planting. If grass clumps up on the skids, they will just ride up on top of the ground or dig a real wide groove. Kind of a pain...

    If you buy one, make sure the skids are in good shape. One of mine was cracked and bent, but I managed to rig something to get it back in line. Also, make sure the hoppers are not rusted out and everything turns when the back wheels are turning.

    I would like to get rid of mine and find a two-row no-till planter. I think that would make life a lot easier.

    Or if you want to sell a pair of plates that will work for sunflowers, I'd be interested.
     
  6. PaulinKansas

    PaulinKansas Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    4,362
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2000
    Location:
    Coffeyville, KS
    Some of my metal seed plates had holes that were way too big for milo/sorghum. I filled them in with epoxy putty and used a dremel tool to make an opening of the proper size.
     

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