Idaho to ban flooded corn?

Discussion in 'Idaho Flyway Forum' started by sdkidaho, Aug 11, 2018.

  1. Sprig Shooter

    Sprig Shooter New Member

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    I'm all for more duck habitat! I just want a concise interpretation of what is legal and what is unlawful when it comes to hunting over cultivated agriculture and or flooded fields.

    Regards,

    JR
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2018
  2. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

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    It is pretty simple.
     
  3. Sprig Shooter

    Sprig Shooter New Member

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    Maybe, maybe not!

    If a savvy individual "late planted" corn, so that by the beginning of the hunting season it was only three and a half feet tall with immature ears instead of seven feet tall with mature ears, would that be considered a standing crop?

    Standing immature corn has no real commercial value which is part of the definition of a crop i.e. A cultivated plant that is grown on a large scale commercially, especially a cereal, fruit, or vegetable. It does however have great drawing power to ducks and geese, especially if you flood it with a foot of water.

    I'm playing the devil's advocate of course, but I could see this scenario actually happening here in Idaho. The farmer would just claim it was a failed crop (loss) and after a few freezes that's exactly what it would look like.

    Duck hunting is becoming a big dollar business in this state, with some guys paying ten grand a season to hunt over flooded corn. Maybe that's why the State is getting involved.

    Regards,

    JR
     
  4. ZDOG

    ZDOG Senior Refuge Member

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    Thousands upon thousands of acres of rice fields are flooded for duck hunting each year. Its harvested of course but a lot of rice remains in those fields afterwards. And thousands of birds use these fields each day, sooo?
     
  5. HaydenHunter

    HaydenHunter Elite Refuge Member

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    I had the pleasure of hunting for a couple of days as a guest a real nice lease in the Columbia Basin last year. While we had good shooting, the lease holder reports that his bird harvests have declined with the increase in nearby flooded corn plots. You could see the birds piling into those areas. On the days they are not hunted they do hold a lot of birds. More birds short stopping in the Basin: good for Washington not good for California. But the impacts are being seen on traditionally good (pre-flooded corn era) leases, especially on days when a flooded plot not hunted is something akin to a huge refuge closed zone.
     
  6. Duck-Slayer

    Duck-Slayer Elite Refuge Member

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    Speaking of CA... It used to be good for waterfowl when they had water. I know 70% of the rice production around Chico and South a little ways had been taken over by pistachio and almond orchards because of the limited water. I think that has an effect on the birds that are short stopping and not making it too CA. Got a friend that lives in Chico only reason I know this to be true.
    Matt
     
  7. HaydenHunter

    HaydenHunter Elite Refuge Member

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    Matt, I have friends in California so I have been able to hunt their property in the epicenter of the Sac Valley flyway a time or two each year. Almond orchards are proliferating to be sure, but the consensus among hunters for the main reason hunting success has declined is rot water. Rot water is rice ponds that are flooded up to rot the stubble and prepare for the next season's planting. In the good old days, stubble was burned. But burning is allowed only on a small fraction of the land that needs it. Because there are so many acres flooded with rot water, the birds have spread out and of course, they prefer ponds that are not hunted. It can be maddening as you drive down the road and see thousands of ducks on ponds here and there that no one is pressuring or moving. Good hunting (unless you are in the Butte Sink) generally happens on wind / storm days. I have a particular knack for hunting down there on bluebird days. You don't want to waste any opportunities since you aren't going to get many. California guys will play hooky from work or do whatever it takes to hunt the storms. Even then, the big storms that could be counted on in December and January are absent or come in February if at all.

    You also hear the theory from guys on the California Forum that the flooded corn complexes of the Columbia Basin has short stopped many birds (particularly mallards) that used to come through California. I think I saw that last year when I was able to make a trip to the basin. First time I'd ever hunted it. Mallard city.
     
  8. junkie

    junkie Refuge Member

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    This was a proposal by a senior member of the senate who got skunked several times on his property next to a flooded corn field. He got all pissed and thought he could slip this in without anyone noticing. He did find out that a lot more people were paying attention and this got squashed. This is NOT law in Idaho
     
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  9. seal

    seal Elite Refuge Member

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    LOL @ all the "hunters" defending flooding crops to "hunt". This activity is no more than glorified baiting in my estimation. This is not "duck habitat" and using habitat as a speaking point is akin to the mafia claiming their activities are to provide jobs and improve the economy lol. What is the difference between growing corn and then flooding it for the sole purpose of killing ducks in it and opening a bag of corn and throwing it in my pond?? The only real difference is the baiter saving themselves thousands of dollars and a lot of labor. Most of these "clubs" are nothing more than a bunch of rich fat cats that really aren't interested in "hunting" as much as they are "killing".
     
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  10. Sprig Shooter

    Sprig Shooter New Member

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    I think you pretty much accurately summed it up!
     

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