On The Bench: February 2019

Discussion in 'Decoy Forum' started by sdkidaho, Feb 7, 2019.

  1. Billy Bob

    Billy Bob Elite Refuge Member

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    SWAMPLVR, Those wigeon turned out great. I'm a big fan of wigeon decoys.

    slough hunter, nice work on the doves, they may inspire me to attempt one in the future.

    Phil, I like the shape of those greenheads but they're naked. :l

    Nice work, all of you. Thanks for sharing. :clap
     
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  2. slough hunter

    slough hunter New Member

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    Pretty much done with this mallard may put a couple washes on to even out some things after a couple days of looking at it. 20190210_102822.jpg
     
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  3. Neighbor Guy

    Neighbor Guy Refuge Member

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    Central MN
    5CECF037-2097-474E-9356-6904CD4022CF.jpeg 3A821896-823D-49D8-B887-C176561085A2.jpeg

    Pictures aren’t the best, but they tell the story. Puts a bow on the kids carving for the year. They are talking bluewing teal for next fall. So time to dig through my patterns and start putting together a paint schedule.
     
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  4. MLBob

    MLBob Senior Refuge Member

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    Something I began doing years ago to replicate the feathering on heads of working decoys (especially hens), and that turned out to be a great way of doing the vermicuation on any duck that is heavily vermiculated is to use an artists rotary cylinder spatter-tool as well as ordinary discarded tooth brushes to get the effect. I apply my base colors and shading first, then come back over top of them with the spatter in a variety of primary colors found on the particular species. What happens is that the viewers eye in effect "mixes" the color. As you move away from the decoy, the effect becomes even more pronounced. Wigeon are one species that this works particularly well on, although the hen is easily the most difficult bird to get the spatter done right on. Here are some pics of wigeon while the head was being painted with the spatter technique, and a shot of a wigeon pair that shows how the spatter can be utilized on the vermiculated feathering of the drakes body as well.

    noisywidgeon 010 (600 x 414).jpg Widhen 001 (600 x 399).jpg

    z (600 x 399).jpg IMGP8451 (600 x 543).jpg

    IMGP8602 (600 x 367).jpg

    A more detaile description of the whole process can be found at my page at:

    https://www.facebook.com/KOOIdecoy/

    You may have to scroll way back to posts from the winter of 2014 (Feb.???) to locate the information
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
  5. slough hunter

    slough hunter New Member

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    Outstanding Bob. I have always liked the results that spatter painting technique produces.
     
  6. SWAMPLVR

    SWAMPLVR Elite Refuge Member

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    5E429923-0D39-4636-B05E-BCCF8C959625.jpeg Base coat of thick oil on this pair. Funny that with clothes on you cannot tell which is bass and which is lumberyard wood. Through experience I know there will be no long term function issues with either

    Thinner layers of oils will be painted on over the next week or so to build color. Paint for 15 minutes wait 12 hours and repeat
     
  7. creedsduckman

    creedsduckman Elite Refuge Member

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    Ringnecks or lessers?
     
  8. MLBob

    MLBob Senior Refuge Member

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    Thanks. It can be adapted to a wide variety of species, both puddlers & divers of both sexes, as well as being combined with other traditional methods like combing & ragging. The scaup pictured here (Greaters) were done using spatter on the hen and a combination of combing & spatter on the drake. I have also done drakes with straight spatter and like the results that both ways produce.

    gspair 025 (600 x 399).jpg greaters.jpg

    Here is a look at the Kemper artist spatter brush ( the two cylindrical brushes on the left) which I mentioned using along with the toothbrushes for applying spatter:
    brushes (600 x 399).jpg

    Here is a picture of the Kemper brush being used to lay spatter on a black duck carving's head. It takes a while to get the various brushes to throw the dot patterns you'd want, and I have a variety of old toothbrushes that give me different size dots based on the stiffness of the bristles. Of course, complete control can sometimes be an issue. That's what the Q tips I have in my mouth (what I refer to as my "paint erasers") are used for. Sometimes the spatter brushes will throw an errant blob that can be removed quickly with a Q-tip swab while still wet.
    IMGP0055 (600 x 357).jpg
     
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  9. SWAMPLVR

    SWAMPLVR Elite Refuge Member

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    Lessers. Pattern and paint could easily be changed to make it a ringer. Had a customer wanting a unique lesser decoy. So far he is pleased. I get to keep the practice bird for my own rig. It will get shot over, a lot.
     
  10. creedsduckman

    creedsduckman Elite Refuge Member

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    That's what I figured. The gray side pockets on the one threw me off a little.
     

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