Pit size and inside pit pics???

Discussion in 'Goose Hunting Forum' started by blackfoot1, Aug 10, 2006.

  1. blackfoot1

    blackfoot1 Elite Refuge Member

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    Hey, got a chance to build some pits here in Texas on some of our hard to hunt wheat fields, going with 4 foot deep, by 4 foot wide, by 16 foot long. Need to be bigger? Is 16 foot long/big enough to hunt 7 people? Does anybody have any inside pics of their pits?? Did a search but wasn't too successful. Thanks,brian
     
  2. Big Bad Wolf

    Big Bad Wolf Elite Refuge Member

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    You can hunt 7 out of a 16 footer but it will be really tight. I would make it 20 feet. 4 feet deep, is also pretty shallow. It is hard to call out of a 4 footer. You really can't stand up. You spend the day, scrunched down trying to follow birds. It sucks. I like deep pits that have a step up. You can call from the floor, where your heads just barely peaks over the the lid, then you step up to shoot. Much more comfortable in my opinion.
     
  3. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

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    Big Bad Wolf hit it pretty well. I've hunted out of one of his pits, and it was very well put together for killing geese. I always allow 3ft of width per hunter when building a blind or pit. A 4ft deep pit isn't nearly as hard for me to hide in as it is him, but you have to have the tallest hunter in mind when figuring your depth.

    If you typically hunt with the same guys, the shooting step can be customized for differing heights. Otherwise make it low enough for the tallest guy you expect to hunt with, and then build some wooden booster steps for shorter hunters and kids. They can be stored under the bench when they aren't needed.

    I figuring your depth don't forget to take the thickness of whatever overhead cover you use to brush with into account. Of course in wheat whatever you use will have to be pretty thin.

    Bill
     
  4. scoutdawg

    scoutdawg Senior Refuge Member

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    I aggree with BBF on the height. One of our pits was only about 5' tall and we had a swivel chair on a pipe stand that made it ok to call from. Other hunters without however ended up slouching. Of course they were supposed to be sitting their @$$ down while the birds were above. Nothing like broom corn being bounced around by a few heads. I would also make it a lil wider if ya can. 4' is a lil tight, and you might as well have plenty of room for 1" x 6" shevles, and gun rests. While your at...build ya a rack for a small propane stove that will fold up and not be in the way of the hunt. My 0.02 cents
     
  5. A-5pemberton

    A-5pemberton Senior Refuge Member

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    my suggestion would be to make it wider, say 5' or 6'. this offers two things. one, with a sliding bench you can hunt in two directions depending on the wind. two, you segment your roof, to accomadate the above situation and and this makes the roof smaller and easier to raise.
     
  6. Inyoface

    Inyoface Elite Refuge Member

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    great suggestions guys
     
  7. don835

    don835 Elite Refuge Member

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    You have some GREAT advice thus far. After building several pits myself I can tell you that no matter how big you build your pit it won't be big enough.:D
    Just remember to allow head room on the seats to include cushions. Also pay close attention to the vertical depth of the pit. I measured from my arm pit to the floor and got it about right for most guys 5' 10" and up.
    Good Luck,

    Murph.:tu
     
  8. Big Bad Wolf

    Big Bad Wolf Elite Refuge Member

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    Another thing to consider is a false floor with about 12-18 of freeboard underneath it. You build a sump hole in a back corner, large enough to fit a water pump head into so you can pump her out after a good rain. The false floor allows you to pump below the floor level so after pumping, more rain or seepage fill up below the floor and you aren't sloshing around in 3 inches of standing water bitchin' about your hat or glove you just dunked. This is goin gto add 12-18 inches to whatever depth you have determined is good for hunting.
     
  9. Empty Skies

    Empty Skies Elite Refuge Member

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    That's how ours are built with a false floor & drain plug always open so she won't float up. Pits are 25 ft. long 7ft. wide & 7 ft. deep.
     
  10. deadringer

    deadringer New Member

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    Milan, IL, USA
    Both of our pits are the same size, 6 foot front to back, 5 foot deep and 20 ft long. We can hunt up to five across very comfortably. We dug the pit deep, put some rock down, put some drainage tile in, covered with rock and then put the pit on top of the rock.........bone dry, even during the wetyears. Helps having the farmer hunt with us (and adictated to goose hunting). He hooked it up to the tile in the field later. I looked for pictures, can't find them, taken during installation and shows the inside. Maybe I can get the daughter to scan some for posting. But I've been after her all summer to get it done.

    Reminds me that we're putting the duck blind in tomorrow, grab the camera.

    Deadringer
     

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