Plants - ID

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by 4scout, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. 4scout

    4scout Refuge Member

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    Trying to figure out what these are...Is the plant with the yellow spikelets red-root flatsedge...hoping its yellow nutsedge? Is that barnyard grass on the left side of that same picture? What is the plant with the larger leaves? Trying to figure out whether to keep. Thanks for the help.
     

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  2. Clayton

    Clayton Moderator Moderator

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    It does appear to be barnyardgrass and the sedge appears to be yellow-nut sedge. Really need a better look at the seed head to be 100% for sure.

    The other is either Pennsylvania smartweed or nodding smartweed. Leaning towards PN.
     
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  3. 4scout

    4scout Refuge Member

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    closeup.jpg 20180610_135229.jpg Thanks Clayton! Here's a zoomed in picture, maybe this will help. I have a lot of it growing as shown in this picture. Is there anything special I need to do in order to make sure there are seeds or nutlets when waterfowl season gets here such as bushhog, fertilize, etc? I was thinking about trying to grow rice or corn this year but I'd have to kill most all of it to plant crops. The deer and coons wreak havoc on the corn so I was leaning towards rice. Do you think these natural food sources would be better for attracting waterfowl? What types of ducks typically feed on these plants? Thanks for all of the help.
     
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  4. Clayton

    Clayton Moderator Moderator

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    The seed head is denser than is typical of yellow-nut sedge but I have seen it like that before. Typically but not 100% the case if yellow-nut sedge produces seed it does not produce tubers and vice versa. Good tuber production is dependent upon good soil moisture. If you can irrigate it or even capture rain it would help. Don’t outright flood it more than a few days just keep wet. Never heard of trying to fertilize it but fertilizer is used when planting the domestic version chufa. Fertilizing moist soil has been tried and found to not increase seed production just taller more robust plants. This may not be true with tuber production. To the best of my knowledge nobody has tried it.
     
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  5. JFG

    JFG Elite Refuge Member

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    Not sure where you’re located and what kind of ducks dominate your area but if you’ve ever seen the episodes of “Honey Brake Experience”, they manage a ton of acres in moist soil and kill almost the full spectrum of puddlers and even some divers. Of course they have 3k acres so they hold birds all season long. Have friends that go there some.
     
  6. 4scout

    4scout Refuge Member

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    I'm located in West TN so we see several different types of ducks depending on the season. Do the ducks mainly feed on the tubers and not so much on the seeds? How would you rate it for waterfowl if it does not produce tubers? If I pulled up a plant now would it possibly have tubers or does that happen later in it's growth cycle? I also have a lot of it growing directly in front of the blind where the decoys typically are located, how tall does it grow? Thanks for all of your help!
     
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  7. Clayton

    Clayton Moderator Moderator

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    The tubers are favored by mallards, black ducks and geese as well as canvasback if deeply flooded. Keep in mind you can't flood it so deep that the mallards/black ducks are unable to dig up the tubers. They do eat the seed but the seed yield is less than red-root flatsedge. Pretty much all duck species will eat the seed. Tubers may be very small this early. Probably just a slight bump on the roots. Use a shovel to dig up some plants and then rinse off the roots in a puddle or take home and hose off. Hand pulling can be hit and miss because if the tubers have gotten large they can break off in the ground. Two to two and half feet tall is usually about it on height.
     
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  8. DisplacedDuck

    DisplacedDuck Senior Refuge Member

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    I've never hunted over chufa or similar tubers, but I have heard that under certain circumstances (as is with all hunting) the hunting can be great.

    Clayton may be able to speak more to this and to correct me if I'm wrong, but I think these tubers are sought after as food for waterfowl because their nutritional value differs than most other grains, moist soil plants, etc. Think of it as another part of the food pyramid. Am I in the right ballpark, Clayton?
     
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  9. 4scout

    4scout Refuge Member

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    Thanks for the information! Glad you mentioned to use a shovel because I was going to use my hands. I'll dig some up next time I'm there and see what I can find out.
     
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  10. Clayton

    Clayton Moderator Moderator

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    I call the tubers duck cocaine. As soon as it is wet enough they can dig them up they will.
     
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