slide in pickup camper

Discussion in 'The Duck Hunters Forum' started by bad dog, Jan 8, 2019.

  1. bad dog

    bad dog Senior Refuge Member

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    after readin birdman's post on travel trailer thought id ask about pickup campers.3/4 ton full 8ft bed.want to be able to pull boat or decoy trailer.probably 10 year investment.bad dog
     
  2. PaulinKansas

    PaulinKansas Elite Refuge Member

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    unless you have a high tolerance for misery, I suggest a self propelled camper to tow your boat or trailer. It'll cost more, but you will have a place to take a crap, shower, cook food, and entertain.
     
  3. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator

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    No current experience, but I was raised with Alaskan Campers. Dad's first one was not a cab-over. Looked like a shell. I slept in the bunk, Dad slept on the couch/bed.
    Then he got a cab-over. Much nicer with the main bed over the cab.

    Most any in-bed camper is a place to sit, cook, eat, and sleep. Not for lounging, not for entertaining, and (IMO) not for more than 2 people. Even at that, one will have to sit, or go outside, while the other one cooks or does chores.

    What is nice is you can put racks on top, and carry a boat. With it down, it is very easy to get them off the racks.

    Lots of great memories in those campers.

    https://www.truckcampermagazine.com/buyers-guide/pop-up-truck-campers/alaskan-camper/
     
    Sault Ste. Marie likes this.
  4. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator

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    The other advantages are you can get your 'bed' back in the off season. Jacks on the side, and you can park it on your property. No extra licensing, small extra insurance to cover the camper. No extra tires, oil changes, etc. If you are ok with the smaller, cramped quarters, they can be a good way to go.
    For me, any camper/trailer is just a place to sleep. I cook outside, sit outside, spend most of my time outside. That is why I eventually went the camp tent route. Cabelas Alaknak. Lots of room, easy to set up and take down. I can toss everything I need in the back of the truck, or my flatbed trailer if I am hauling lots of gear (Canada trip). Zero cost after purchase.
     
  5. Ron Gilmore

    Ron Gilmore Elite Refuge Member

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    Had one for a good number of years. Great for weekend outings nice for hunting trips as well.

    Two is good three right.
     
  6. salthunter

    salthunter Moderator Moderator

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    If I was a always going alone I would own a cab over but my wife makes it too tight and the crawl up in is tough.

    I was a tent guy. most tent camps were 20 minutes to set up 22 minutes to break camp. The past 10 years I spent over 500 nights in all months. My bones hurt and it is a rotten deal walking in and out of a tent with much snow. A couple years ago we started sleeping in the back of a shell,.. but getting up to go pee and putting boots on is a real hassle when I dont bend like I use to.
    Lots of advantages to tent camping. For me its the outside sounds Nothing like coyotes deer elk or bear walking around a tent ,.. just makes me smile
     
  7. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator

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    Oh, I agree, but I don't winter camp. Summers or my Canada trips.
    upload_2019-1-8_22-52-22.png
    upload_2019-1-8_22-52-45.png

    I went alone this year. Setting camp was fine. Tent goes up in about 20 minutes, even alone. Tearing down was another matter. One guy folding a 10x20 tent in a 25mph wind isn't fun.

    Dad and I were very comfy even in the smaller Alaskan. Of course, I was younger then, from about 7 to 12 or so. Then he got the bigger one, and that was like staying in a cabin compared to the smaller one. I could get up into the cab-over bed and be out of the way while Dad cooked. (or fall asleep till he was done)

    There are other pop-up options out there, but the ones I see I wonder if they are truly 4-Season. The Alaskans were well insulated. Where we went to hunt, either Northern NV, or Central NV, it was not uncommon to hit below 0 temps. Once I remember -20. That was a cold hunt, but the hot creek was full of greenheads. Funny how you don't notice the cold when that happens.
     
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  8. callinfowl

    callinfowl Kalifornia Forum Moderator

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    Lance and be done with it.
    Alaskan's were great campers, heavy as hell thought for their size.
    My Dad always had them as well, he also had the in the bed size at first then when my bro and me got bigger he had the 10' cab over, which was like the Hilton for the three of us. One of the ranches I get to hunt is off grid and instead of everyone sleeping in the cabin there are five old Alaskan cab overs set on a gravel pad so everyone get their own room. These campers are from the late 1960s and the stoves, heaters, plumbing and propane lamps still work and the roofs don't leak. They are an awesome camper, I love how they crank up from a foot above the cab to 3 to 4 feet over the cab, they are built like a bomb shelter, tuff, tuff, tuff.:yes
     
  9. Tailfeathers

    Tailfeathers Elite Refuge Member

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    Looked at their website. Sorry, $35,000 for a slide in to me is just nuts. Take that $ and use it for a fixer upper house near the ducking and fishing near the water in NC or SC,Va Eastern shore with a small mortgage makes more sense to me. Heck, buy a patch of land near the water for around $3k to $5k and put a craigs list $4k older pull behind travel trailer on it, or just buy the trailer, redo it a bit and keep the rest of the $30K in the bank, earning money and travel around the hunting and fishing places.
     
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  10. riverrat47

    riverrat47 Elite Refuge Member

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    I had a palomino bronco fold down for a year or two. It was a fun little rig. Here are a few things people told me or I learned thru trial and error.
    1) Get a heavy duty truck. Even if it says it's compatible with a 1/2 ton, get a 3/4. When you are fighting a crosswind or on rough ground, you will appreciate it.
    2) If it hangs out past the bumper, BE CAREFUL. You are used to being able to back up further than you now can.
    3) Unless you are towing a boat or trailer, you sure ain't carrying many decoys.
    4) Stopping for the night takes lots of rearranging in order to use the camper. Decoy bags, electrical cords, hose, etc., are in the camper, somewhere.
    5) At least for me, working by myself, it took a lot longer than I thought it would to get the camper centered in the truck bed. I never did get very proficient at it.
    6) I slept in mine with the heat set very low or a small ceramic heater and was very comfortable in temps in the low teens. Didn't have any sub zero temps.
    7) Get one with supports at all four corners. It will feel steadier off the truck.
    8) Another negative was my dog never liked it. I had to virtually force him into it. I don't know if the minor unsteadiness scared him or the fact that I was afraid to let him on the cab over bed with me (fear that he might get injured jumping down) made him uncomfortable. If he wanted out during the night, it was nearly impossible to get him to get him back in. Oft times, I'd end up putting him in the cab of the truck or wake to find him under the camper. Took a lot of fun out of it.
    9) Traveling during duck season, I found that many campgrounds were closed for the season. Some, especially along the interstates, were expensive, road noisy and run by dog Nazi's that were on you like a duck on a June bug if you even loaded the dog from the camper to the truck w/o being on a leash.

    I'd read Michael Furtman's book, "On the Wings of a West Wind," and several other camper travel/hunter books-Jim Fergus (sp?) and thought it sounded like an exciting way to spend my falls in retirement. I had visions of making a lot of trips with that camper, but the hassles loading it, storage, dog problems, put a for sale sign on it post haste.
     

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