Steal a stick shift?

Discussion in 'The Duck Hunters Forum' started by sdkidaho, May 7, 2019.

  1. HaydenHunter

    HaydenHunter Elite Refuge Member

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    Learned how to drive on my dad's '61 Rambler wagon with three on the tree. My cars during high school and college were a mustang, a Camaro, a '75 VW Rabbit (first year of the model) and a Mazda pickup truck. All manual tranny. Then came a Toyota pickup truck in '81, my wife's Honda Accord and then our '79 528 Bimmer. All manual. Thirty-five years ago I started driving automatics in my company cars and trucks. Averaged 40-45K miles / year. Covered up to11 states and a couple of Canadian provinces at one time, with stop and go traffic in a lot of major cities. Retired in 2017. Driving a stick in stop and go traffic, especially in hilly cities like Seattle and SF, is brutal. Doing that for work led me to driving automatics.
     
  2. Squaller

    Squaller Elite Refuge Member

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    Never thought of that before...

    Before reading this post, someone was just asking me about teaching her child on a stick shift... I told her she'd probably have to find someone with a Porsche some other high-end sports car... I know of nobody that owns one (outside of some friends with sportscars).

    When purchasing my last truck (used) I actually looked around for a stick... Never saw a single newer full-sized truck with a manual transmission.

    I learned on a 1950's column shift truck when I was about 14... Had to drive it where I worked to transport stuff. Boss handed me the keys and said figure it out. Luckily one of the other workers was kind enough to give me a "quick lesson." There were some gears that got grinded...
     
  3. Mort

    Mort Elite Refuge Member Supporting Member

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    The first vehicle I drove was a 30's-40's era one ton flat bed truck with a stick. I was about 10-12 years old. My cousin was was throwing hay off the truck into one of those feed bins while I drove close to the bins. I drove a little too close and dented the right front fender. I learned how to back up a trailer using an old 1930's era Ford tractor. Had to back the trailer up on a curved one-lane road through the woods to the dump, because there was no room to turn around once you got there. The first vehicle I owned was a 1966 Ford truck with a four on the floor. I will be starting to teach my grand children how to drive in my dad's front pasture using his 1941 Willy's Jeep.
     
  4. callinfowl

    callinfowl Kalifornia Forum Moderator

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    I learned to drive a 4 speed 1965 Chevy pickup at 13yrs old. Not because I wanted to, because my dad ran a grinder across his knee and was bleeding bad, he said lets go and you're driving. I must've stalled the truck 50 times in 10 miles. A week later I was driving it like a pro. :yes:tu
     
  5. tcc

    tcc Elite Refuge Member

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    Wait a second---people actually take their keys out of their truck? :confused:
     
  6. stevena198301

    stevena198301 Elite Refuge Member Supporting Member

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    Learned on a 1968 VW bug, in the strip pits. That thing would go anywhere the big trucks went. Learning to use a clutch on reclaimed strip pit hills requires quick learning.

    Next was a Mazda 2600 4x4 PU. That poor, poor truck...

    I enjoy autos now. I can roll through the gears in my truck at any RPM I’d like by enabling the manual shift mode. Can also use it for an engine brake. It defaults to 4th gear when you roll the lever over. I stay in manual mode more than D. Never liked using a clutch for gear changing once I found out it wasn’t needed. My dad taught me that at 15, and I amazed all my buddies.
     
  7. callinfowl

    callinfowl Kalifornia Forum Moderator

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    302 is a great boat motor because of the high revs they are known for, sweet set up.:tu

    His dad was best friends with one of the Morgan brothers that ownned Morgan's Machine Shops, they had a pretty decent set of tools I guess.:l
    I went to high scool with one of the Morgan boy's he drove a lifted Toyota 4x4 that had a Chevy L88 out of a 69 Stingray. So they were pretty good at retrofitting and fitting big engines into small spaces.:yes:yes:yes
     
  8. callinfowl

    callinfowl Kalifornia Forum Moderator

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    I just found this, so I guess stranger things can happen.


    This thing would be insane to drive.:yes:yes:yes
     
  9. JP

    JP Elite Refuge Member

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    Wonder how many of today’s kids would think “slipping the clutch” is a dread disease?
     
    RTIC likes this.
  10. RTIC

    RTIC Senior Refuge Member

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    Learned on an 86 full size chevy with a 305. It was a 4 on the floor with low an old farm truck. I put a new cam timing chain, straight dual exhaust and bunch of other crap that i thought was needed. Loved that truck.
    I brake with my left foot since going to an automatic. It was just habit to have it pushing a pedal.
     

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