Sunflowers, Doves, Chemicals

Discussion in 'The Duck Hunters Forum' started by hartfish, May 16, 2018.

  1. hartfish

    hartfish Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    4,560
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2005
    Location:
    virginia
    Anyone spray their own chemicals on their dove fields? I'm fixing to plant about an acre and my local farmer's co-op is giving me the run-around on spraying, so I may do it myself.

    I know the pre-emergent chemicals are Spartan and Dual Magnum, but what about liquid nitrogen? I believe my local co-op uses nitrogen in the mix, but I can't seem to find any information about application rates and mixing.

    Can I mix it with the herbicides? What is the general application rate for nitrogen? I've seen 20-0-0 liquid fertilizer. Is that what I should use?
     
  2. Deck III

    Deck III Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    140
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2006
    Location:
    Louisiana
    We mow the field down, spray roundup, come back a week later disc it up, broadcast the seed, put out some triple 13 and disc back over. I see nothing wrong with the 20-0-0 just get it in the ground, if it is urea it will evaporate quickly if sprayed on top.
     
  3. Tailfeathers

    Tailfeathers Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    12,857
    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2001
    Location:
    Virginia
    Speaking of sunflowers, I have a question. In my back yard I have a circular garden about 25 feet in circumference that I used to grow tomatoes in. Lots of sun. Last year I just dumped my grass clippings in to keep the weeds from growing, no tomatoes or anything planted. This year I want to grow wall to wall sunflowers. I see oiled sunflower bags for bird food at Walmart at like $9 a bag. Will these germinate? I see little packets of sunflower seeds, at Tractor Supply but i'd need a lot of packets. I guess I can go to a Co Op about an hour away or States etc. What do you guys think. I have a mini roto tiller, should I till those grass clippings into the ground along with some granular fertilizer?
     
  4. J.SCOTT

    J.SCOTT Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    630
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2013
    Location:
    TENNESSEE
    Yes, the 9 dollar bag will germinate. It will not germinate a well as certified planting seed, but for your purposes, it will do. If you want the giant sunflower heads, you'll have to buy that type of seed.
     
  5. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator Flyway Manager

    Messages:
    18,642
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2003
    Location:
    Sula, MT
    I plant those in my garden every year, just for cheap cover and color. They grow pretty well. Not real tall, maybe 3'. I fence it in to keep my bunnies and the deer our, the pull the fence and let em have at it.
    I buy mine in the large bag, like $22, and maybe 40lbs (not sure, like a large dog food bag)
     
  6. Sunklands

    Sunklands Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,056
    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2016
    Location:
    Acorn Ridge
    I plant about a 5 acres of black oils each year. I disk the ground, hip it, and apply pre emerge herbicide while planting. I use generic Dual(metolachlor) and Spartan. Generally they will stay clean but common ragweeds can be found from time to time.
     
  7. Tailfeathers

    Tailfeathers Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    12,857
    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2001
    Location:
    Virginia
    Thanks guys for your info. Looks like thats what I will do. What's left over, I'll throw on the edges of the farm we hunt for dove and geese.
     
  8. waterrat

    waterrat Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,209
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2002
    Location:
    catching fish in OK
    Sunflower are extremely prolific. I grew some mammoth and red sunflowers one year. It took my 5-6yrs to kill them back out.
     
    The_Duck_Master likes this.
  9. J.Bennett

    J.Bennett Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    6,514
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2008
    Location:
    Acampo, California
    I always read about folks in other parts of the country planting sunflower for dove. Always spraying this and that or complaining about the deer getting into them... You guys ever try planting safflower? It’s all we ever plant around here for dove.

    Safflower and sunflower are both farmed in my area and in my experience, doves will fly right by a sunflower field to land in a safflower field and won’t start hitting the sunflowers until the safflower has been fed out.

    Disk, broadcast and harrow in while there is still a little moisture in the ground but before the last couple inches of rain fall. It out-competes almost all the weeds for water and after it sucks all the moisture out of the ground, it will dry out on its own. The deer won’t eat it unless they are starving. A little over a month before the season, make a few passes with the mower around the perimeter and mow the rest about 2 weeks before the season (you can leave a 10’ strip standing where you will have the "firing line"). The only things that I've ever seen go wrong with a safflower field is if it rains before it germinates and the soil forms a "crust" that the seedlings can't break through, if it is planted somewhere that has residual broadleaf herbicide in the soil (2,4D), or if it is planted in a spot where the water table very shallow (it can grow a 6' tap root and if it is able to hit water, it won't dry out properly).
     
  10. cootmeurer

    cootmeurer Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    4,068
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2003
    Location:
    FayetteNam NC
    If you have a lot of deer, dont expect much from your sunflowers. When they just head out and the seeds are immature and sweet and tender, the deer will eat every seed head.

    I personally think for a dove field I would look at WGF Sorghum, or one of the millets which are not as attractive to deer. Then you can cheaply control the weeds with 2,4-D and you can tailor exactly when you want your dove shoot. A week before you want to shoot, mow strips that you disk or till down, and plant some wheat. The doves will find it, and you are staying within the guidelines of agricultural practices.
     

Share This Page