Taking your kids hunting.

Discussion in 'The Duck Hunters Forum' started by BugDude, Nov 30, 2017.

  1. Hardcore Waterfowler

    Hardcore Waterfowler Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    139
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2016
    Location:
    Yakima, Washington
    Bugdude, Take her!! One thing I did with my boys when they were young like that was I took them in a wheel barrel. Sounds odd I know but I would put decoys and gear in the wheel barrel and sit kids on top of gear. They had a ball riding it out to the blind (it kept the morning dew off their clothes and we were able to keep up with the rest of the family walking out). Once to the blind we would ditch the wheel barrel and cover it with reeds and such. For us we had a gravel road with a few water crossings before hitting the blind so a wheel barrel worked well. Might consider replacing the wheel barrel with a sled, deer cart, or any other viable mode of transportation for your environment. It will help them dry, rested, and save your back. The other thing I would suggest is to pack a bb gun or a sling shot for her. Start teaching her how to spot game and proper gun safety. It will help her to feel as though she actually hunting right along the side of you. The Biggest thing I would suggest though is warmth and food. Kids seem to find things to do and can even sleep out of boredom if they are warm and fed. The only down side I ever faced was having to call a few hunts short during prime time due to extreme cold (for little kids). But it was well worth it in the long run. I now have three grown boys that absolutely love going every weekend with me into the duck blind. I know that if I had forced them to stay out there and freeze while dad hunted that they would've given up on duck hunting.

    What is the worse that can happen when she goes? She will say dad, I'm either cold or bored, or may become impatient. You then pack things up and take your little girl out to breakfast. Either way the two of you get to spend some quality time together. Nothing wrong with missing out on a few ducks as you chow down on a stack of pancakes and talk about the morning hunt. To her it will have been the best hunt of her life. That is until the next week. ;)
     
    marsh man dan likes this.
  2. kberggren

    kberggren Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    450
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Location:
    Iowa but Nebraska at Heart
    My Niece started going when she was 3-4 years old and My Nephew about the same but its was always their choice if they wanted to go or stay home with their mom. Katelyn is 10 now and Kaleb is 8, this was over thanksgiving and they had a blast!
    My Brother, his daughter Katelyn, his son Kaleb, and their dog Murphy
    [​IMG]
    Last December
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    Katelyn was 6 here
    [​IMG]
    and maybe 4-5 here, this was dove season with my dog Limit
    [​IMG]
     
    Silver Wings likes this.
  3. jgorski

    jgorski New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2011
    Location:
    Texas
    I think it all depends on the blind and conditions of the location you are hunting. I guided father son/daughter hunts for over 20 years and now have a 9 & 11 yr old but I have yet to take my 9 yr son b/c of the blind set up's we hunt. If they aren't bringing a gun then individual pit blinds is good. Deep blinds make it tough for them to see anything and if weather is bad can be miserable. If your taking a child and expect them to shoot than you should leave your gun at home until which they are 100% capable of handling it and/or if you have a guide that can also watch them. Safety first, accommodations second, then weather.
     
  4. Pintail Slayer

    Pintail Slayer New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2014
    Location:
    CA
    On the subject of taking the kids hunting. I’m a hunter safety instructor here in CA. In CA you can buy your kid a lifetime hunting license before they pass the hunter safety test. The state just doesn’t issue the license until they pass the exam. The reason I say this is because the cost of that license for a kid 9 and under is $519. When they’re 10 it jumps to $847.
    I love taking youngsters duck hunting and as an instructor I can really fill up my duck club for the end of the season youth hunt.
     

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