Vitage style carving

Discussion in 'Decoy Forum' started by Billy Bob, May 13, 2018.

  1. Billy Bob

    Billy Bob Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    5,406
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2007
    Location:
    Washington
    Those are nice working blocks. :tu Thank you for sharing your pics. Here come the questions.. Did you draw your own patterns? What kind of wood? Size? Glass, tack or painted eyes?

    I'm very interested in your "working decoys" as well as the vintage style I have been trying. My first decoys, (many in my pics) were similar to your style only actual life size of the birds because I used them on a small marsh and long distance visibility was not an issue, just numbers that I could fit in a small 8 foot boat. That rig still gets used on that marsh, some of the decoys in it being 25 years old. Thanks again for sharing. :tu
     
  2. Prairiebirder

    Prairiebirder Refuge Member

    Messages:
    34
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2014
    Location:
    Montana
    Thanks Billy, Sorry for the double post of the photo - still trying to get the hang of this site. I started carving back in 1969 when I met Duncan Ducharme, up at the Delta marsh in Manitoba. He could take an old cedar telephone pole and turn out a decoy in about an hour, primarily using hand tools. So with that inspiration I got started and good fortune provided me an abundant supply of abandoned poles. The first poles I found were only big enough to make GWT and buffleheads
     

    Attached Files:

    Billy Bob, WHUP ! Hen and Mean Gene like this.
  3. Mean Gene

    Mean Gene Moderator Moderator Flyway Manager

    Messages:
    20,686
    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2000
    Location:
    NE South Dakota
    Nothing wrong with those at all. :tu


    Looks good to me. :tu
     
  4. WHUP ! Hen

    WHUP ! Hen Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,481
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2007
    Location:
    Northeast Missouri
    7
    Dam, Prariebirder those look like they’ll work good. I had a couple of Duncan’s birds, a superb hen Can and a very early Can drake carved for James Ford Bell, one of the early supporters and benefactors of Delta Marsh. I got them from a young waterfowl biologist that served an internship in the early 50’s. He could really tell some stories.
     

Share This Page