Who had to read the Iliad?

Discussion in 'Book Forum' started by Layout101, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. Layout101

    Layout101 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    7,321
    Joined:
    May 26, 2003
    Location:
    Mississippi Flyway
    OK, who else read this in college thought it was awesome then read it years later and hated it?

    First time I read it I loved it and soaked it in, dug it out a couple years ago and couldn't believe what a boring slow read it seemed now. I guess I have seen to many movie spin offs since that seem way better and I'm not getting graded on my take on it.
     
  2. bkraut

    bkraut Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    365
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2008
    Location:
    Homer, AK
    I was total opposite. Could barely get through it in college and then enjoyed it later. I think the translation plays a big part in it.
     
  3. Layout101

    Layout101 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    7,321
    Joined:
    May 26, 2003
    Location:
    Mississippi Flyway
    It's weird how some required reading is like that. Had to read Melvilles Moby Dick and thought it was OK, then read it years later and couldn't believe how much more I liked it, even ended up traveling to Nantucket a couple times vacationing along the east coast with the family, stopped in New Bedford to check out the museum too. It was neat visiting places from the novel.
    My wife isn't a big reader so before the first trip I would read it to her in the evenings in bed, great experience for both of us.

    Did the same type of thing a couple years ago visiting places in western Europe after getting into reading up on the Templars and medieval history.
     
  4. Peter Goodman

    Peter Goodman Refuge Member

    Messages:
    57
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2015
    Funny, I had a similar reaction. Was too lazy to sell a ton of English Lit books in college, and naturally the edition next year's professor required was different. as students we were too dumb to realize Moby Dick is Moby Dick. Anyway, found the liquor store box of old books when moving years later, read them, and discovered why they were Classic in the first place. because when they were written for their original audience they were a damn good read, and classic since so well written the theme held up over time. Nothing to do with the stuff they tested us on like impact if author's mistress on what he wrote. Just a damn good book - all of them actually.
     
  5. GUNNERX2

    GUNNERX2 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,466
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2007
    Location:
    TENNESSEE
    Required reading in high school along with the Odyssey. Torturous reading for sure. Liked Moby Dick right away. Junior high was just as bad with memorizing the Jabberwocky and Chaucer. I know they were trying to expand my mind but dang, did they have to expand it to the point of exploding?
     
  6. cootmeurer

    cootmeurer Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,730
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2003
    Location:
    FayetteNam NC
    I have always been a voracious reader but can't say the Iliad or the Odyssey did much for me. The only books I remember from high school (meaning - that I grasped and understood them) were Animal Farm and The Hobbit. Hobbit made me a lifetime Tolkien fan, while Animal Farm was being played out live in the Eastern Bloc, and elsewhere.

    I have quite a few of the classics on my Kindle reader and some still have a great draw while others seem now to either lack depth or else drag out seemingly forever.

    That all being said, I still prefer a book to TV - and on several trips to the UK I have found some other very interesting well-aged books. As a general rule I think our more modern works lack eloquence and depth - instead going for quick and flashy. Probably won't be long before there is a sub-genre of Books on Twitter.
     

Share This Page